Archive | Electronics

Kicking Off EU Code Week In Style

On Friday 6th October 2017, Joseph and Dan from Redfern/Mindsets and Mike Cargill from UKSTEM ventured into London, to help UCL kick start European Code Week. 

For those of you that don’t know, the European Code Week (EU Code Week) is a grass-roots initiative set up in 2013 by the Young Advisors for Digital Agenda Europe. The Code Week aims to get as many people as possible, from across Europe and the World, to take part in exciting Computer Science activities. It has been growing in success, with nearly 1 million  participants from across 50 countries taking part in 2016. 

The Code Week kickstart event took place at UCL’s BaseKX, Camden – a modern building, designed to provide a space for business start-ups to establish themselves. We were amongst about 15 different companies, including Lego education, Discovery Espresso and Ohbot. 

The morning started with a few guest speakers, discussing topics ranging from the history of coding, to the development of BaseKX. After a break, the various groups of children found their workshops, and the coding began. We had two different workshops running – one table of 10 children were working on line-drawing buggies, while the other table had a range of activities: our new countdown clock; a probability spinner; a reaction timer; and two matrix Sparkle displays. Each workshop ran for 40 minutes, and there were two more after lunch, so, all together, we got to work with around 60 children from 6 different schools. 

We love doing events like these, as they allow us to see the impact and enjoyment that the Crumble can have/cause. Without this, it’s really hard to judge what’s happening on the ‘front line’, unless we are given explicit feedback. It also gives us a great opportunity to see if our new ideas and projects are worthwhile, and whether they pass judgement from your average primary school child. At each of our workshop sessions there was a real sense of excitement and a buzz in the atmosphere. The children were always focused on their task and they were all desperate to reach the end-goal of their challenge.

When children are new to the Crumble they are great at finding bugs. We were trialling our latest Crumble software update and, sure enough, our first group discovered a bug! This is great because it allows us to fix these issues, before the software becomes public. These events also provide a good platform to test new workshop resources – all of our worksheets were new, along with two new products. As with anything new, there were a couple of teething issues, but this event allowed us to refine our workshop material and make it even better.  

Not only do these events provide us with a platform to let schools know about the Crumble, they provide us with a great opportunity to better ourselves – and for that we are thankful.  

The icing on the cake was being voted the favourite workshop by two separate schools. That’s not bad considering we only worked with six schools and had some high-quality competition!

Read more about Code Week 2017 news and events here.

Science with the Crumble: Test your reactions

HYPOTHESIS: Humans react more quickly to something they hear compared to something they see.

In order to test this hypothesis, we used:

  • Laptop with Crumble software installed
  • Crumble controller & Sparkle baton
  • Crumble-friendly battery box; 3 AA batteries
  • Croc-leads and a micro-USB cable
  • “Crumble-friendly” switch and buzzer

The Crumble, Sparkle baton, switch and battery box are connected in the same way as the last reaction timer project (although the switch is connected to input A, rather than B). The program, however, is much simpler:

At the start, all the Sparkles are turned off. The Crumble waits for a random period of time (between 2 and 6 seconds) and then begins lighting the Sparkles in quick succession (every 50 milliseconds). The aim of the game is to press the switch as quickly as possible. Note: you have to hold down the switch until you have read your “score”. When the switch is released, the game restarts. Joseph & I discovered that, after a bit of practice, we could consistently press the switch after 4 or 5 Sparkle LEDs had lit up (i.e. after 150-200 milliseconds). 

In order to test whether we could react more quickly to a sound, a buzzer was then connected between “output B” and “Ground” (a “-” pad on either the battery box, or the right-hand side of the Sparkle baton). The program was modified so that the buzzer turns on at the same time as the first Sparkle LED:

For a fair test, you have to close your eyes while playing – but remember to open them and read your score before releasing the switch! Now we found that we could press the switch after 3 LEDs were lit (100 ms). 

So, our small sample does support the hypothesis, above. Further reading suggests that humans react even faster to touch-stimulus: can you think of a way to measure that with the Crumble? If you do the experiment with a larger group, let us know your results and we will publish them, here!

Programming challenge: Traffic lights

IMG_1538We used:

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • Crumble controller & Sparkle baton
  • Crumble-friendly switch & ultrasonic distance measuring sensor
  • 1 Crumble-friendly battery box; 3 AA batteries
  • Croc-leads and a micro-USB cable

The traffic light sequence can be programmed to run on a single Sparkle (change all the Sparkle commands in the program below to read “set sparkle 0 to..”), but using 3 chained together or, as here, a sparkle baton is more “true to life”. The traffic lights are set to be the last 3 sparkles on the baton (index numbers 5, 6, and 7 being green, amber, and red, respectively). The program is shown below:

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The sequence simply repeats every 3 seconds, but we can add a switch (here connected between the +ve battery terminal and Input A) to trigger the sequence. In the program below, the green light stays on until the button is pressed. 

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The program was then modified further so that the sparkle at the other end of the baton (index number 0) functions as a “pedestrian crossing”. When the “traffic lights” are green the pedestrian crossing is red. When the button is pressed the traffic lights cycle through amber to red and then the pedestrian crossing sparkle changes to green. After 5 seconds the pedestrian crossing sparkle changes back to red and the traffic lights continue through red-amber to green.pedestrian_cross

For the final challenge we also added an ultrasonic distance sensor with its “trigger” (T) connected to input “C” on the Crumble and “echo” (E) connected to “B”.

As in the program above, the button triggers the traffic lights to change to red. The “pedestrian light” (i.e. Sparkle 0) then remains green until the ultrasonic distance sensor detects a “car” approaching (in this case represented by a hand waving less than 4cm away). The “car” triggers the pedestrian crossing to turn red and the traffic lights to change to green.

Screen Shot traffic_ultra

Unfortunately, the resulting tangle of wires is not very attractive. (Note: I have used the “power out” pads on the Sparkle baton as power inputs for the ultrasonic distance sensor.)

Next challenge: construct something to hold the baton vertical and the ultrasonic module in the right position to detect a lego car!

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Crafty Crumble Creations: A steerable buggy

FullSizeRenderWe used:

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • 1 Crumble controller & 2 Crumble-friendly switches
  • 1 Crumble-friendly battery box; 3 AA batteries
  • A pair of motors (with croc-leads attached) & wheels
  • 4 long & 2 short croc-leads and a micro-USB cable
  • 2 K’nex wheels and an axle.
  • An egg box

The construction of the buggy is ridiculously simple: we pushed the axles of the motors through the sides of an egg box lid, as close to one end as possible, then attached the wheels. For the front wheels we pushed a K’nex axle through he other end of the box and attached a pair of similar sized wheels. (Lego technic would also work fine.) The Crumble and battery box then sit inside the buggy.

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The motors are connected to the Crumble’s motor outputs (the bottom two pads on either side of the Crumble). Note that to get the wheels to turn in the same direction and move the buggy forwards, the motors actually need to turn in opposite directions (as they are arranged back-to-back). This can be achieved in software, by setting one to “forwards” and one to “reverse” or, as shown here, by connecting one motor in the conventional way (red wire to the positive pad; black wire to the negative) and the other motor reversed (red wire to the negative pad).

One of the switches was connected between the second positive output of the battery pack and “input A” on the Crumble (the yellow croc leads). The other switch was connected between the Crumble’s “power out” (top right) pad and input D (the green croc leads). The battery pack is connected to the Crumble in the usual way.

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The Crumble program is shown below. If both switches are pressed (“A is Hi” and “B is Hi”), both motors operate and the buggy moves forwards. If only one switch is pressed, only the motor on that side of the buggy runs and the buggy turns. The green and yellow croc leads are long enough that our 3yr-old can walk behind the buggy and use the buttons to steer it.

Screen Shot buggy prog

NOTE: The motor power is set to only 25%. This ensures that the buggy moves at a slow walking pace but it can also help to reduce glitches (e.g. the motor LEDs on the Crumble flicker, but the spindles don’t turn) due to interference being picked up by the long leads to the switches.

 

Programming Challenge: Reaction timer game

This challenge involves making a reaction timer game with a Sparkle Baton. The aim of the game is to press the button when you see a green light. We used:

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • Crumble controller & Sparkle baton
  • 1 Crumble-friendly battery box; 3 AA batteries
  • Croc-leads and a micro-USB cable
  • A switch (check out our new Crumble-friendly switches!)

Connecting the Crumble

The Sparkle baton is connected in the same way as a single Sparkle: `+’, `-‘ and `D’ on the right-hand side of the Crumble connect to their equivalent pads on the left-hand side of the baton. The switch is connected between the +ve terminal of the battery box and input B on the Crumble (see photo).

Reaction timer game

Programming the Crumble

The program was developed and refined in several stages. First, I wanted a lit LED to “travel” backwards and forwards along the Sparkle Baton: Red_travellingThe variable “t” is the index number of the Sparkle. The variable “u” switches between +1 and -1 every 8 steps, so the “let t=t+u” command increments the Sparkle number from 0 to 7 then decrements it back to 0. At each step, Sparkle “t” is set to red for 100 milliseconds. This whole sequence is placed inside a “do forever” block.

Now, as the red light travels back and forth, we want just one of the Sparkles to turn green, instead. The “set sparkle ‘t’ to red” block is, therefore, replaced with an if-else statement, which changes Sparkle number 3 to green: if_block

The program now needs to respond to user input: the aim is to press the button when you see the green light. Inside the “do forever” loop, we nest a “do until B is HI” loop.

full_prog2When the button is pressed, the program will pause until it is released (“wait until B is LO”). If the user has succeeded in pressing the button when the green LED is lit they have “won”.

In order to emphasize this, a “victory flash” is now inserted: if “t=3” when the button is pressed (i.e. if the Sparkle is green) then all the Sparkles flash green 3 times before the program continues.

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In order to increase the challenge, a variable “time” was created, which determines how quickly the Sparkles turn on and off. Initially, this is set to 300ms and it decreases by 50ms for each successive “correct” push of the button. If the button is pressed at the wrong time, however, the time is reset.

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Can you improve on the game? Ideas:

  • Is there a potential problem if the variable “time” becomes negative? Would it be better to decrease it proportionally rather than by a fixed number of ms?
  • Can you keep track of the “high score” by counting the number of successive, correct button pushes and flashing the same number of Sparkles?
  • What if the green Sparkle is in a different position each time? (Hint: use the “random” operator.) Does this make the game more challenging?

Victory flash

At full strength, the Sparkles are too bright to look at for long periods of time. When writing and debugging programs using Sparkles I usually cover them with (e.g.) one or two sheets of paper.

 

Crafty Crumble Creations: When Santa got stuck up the chimney!

This year our Crumble Christmas decoration uses a servo to control an “animatronic” Santa leg stuck in a chimney decorated with twinkling lights.

We used:

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • Crumble controller; a flexible strip of 30 Sparkle LEDs and a micro Servo (both with crumblisers attached)
  • 1 Crumble-friendly battery box; 3 AA batteries
  • Croc-leads and a micro-USB cable
  • Cardboard blocks, cotton wool balls, cardboard; red and black paint; sellotape & PVA glue

Making the Chimney

The Chimney is made from some sturdy, red cardboard building blocks, that we already had at home, with cotton wool balls stuck on for the “snow”. Santa’s leg is cut out from a cardboard box, painted red and black, with more cotton wool balls as a fur trim. The turning part of the servo is sellotaped onto the back of the leg (excuse the Stormtroooper: we used the box from a Star Wars toy) and the body of the servo is taped onto a smaller yellow block that sits behind and inside the chimney. The Crumble and battery box also rest inside. IMG_9899IMG_9900IMG_9885  

Connecting the Crumble

The Crumble was connected to the battery box with croc-leads and to the computer, using the USB lead. The micro-servo has three connections: power (“+”, “-“) and “control” (labelled “S” on the crumbliser). The power pads were connected to the second set of pads on the battery box and “S” was connected to the Crumble’s pad “C”. The Sparkle strip was connected to “+”,”-“, and “D” on the right-hand side of the Crumble and then wrapped around the base of the chimney. IMG_9897

Programming the Crumble

The servo control block needs to tell the Crumble which output the servo is connected to (in this case “C”) and the angle to set the servo. As this is an absolute, rather than a relative number, we had to do a bit of experimenting. Eventually, we determined that the servo needed to move between 65 and 85 degrees. To slow down the transition, we used a loop which steps the servo 1 degree every 60 milliseconds and a variable “x”, which alternates between 1 and -1, to make it move back and forth. Screen Shot 2015-12-15 at 18.19.04We wanted the Sparkle strip to change colour at the same time as the servo is moving. As there are 20 steps in the loop to move the servo, the simplest way to do this was to use only 20 of the Sparkles. We defined a variable “sprk” to be the index number of the Sparkle. Every time the loop is executed, Sparkles 5 to 25 are set to red, in turn. Variable “x” is used to set the adjacent Sparkle to green. Once we were happy with the effect, we disconnected the Crumble from the computer and placed our decoration on the fireplace. Screen Shot 2015-12-24 at 12.38.51 Can you improve on this and work out how to thread two programs together to use all 30 Sparkles? Merry Christmas!!

Crafty Crumble Creations: A Haunted Castle

We used:IMG_0001

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • Crumble controller, Sparkle baton & single Sparkle
  • 1 Crumble-friendly battery box; 3 AA batteries
  • Croc-leads and a micro-USB cable
  • A “line follower” module
  • Cereal box; egg box, empty wipes packet; cardboard; paint; paper; pens; pin, scissors
  • Sellotape, glue stick and adhesive velcro strip

Connecting the Crumble

IMG_9816A Sparkle baton was used to give the “spooky” green glow. Croc-leads connect the “+”, “-” and “D” pads on the right-hand side of the Crumble to their counterparts on the left-hand (input) side of the baton. Another single Sparkle was connected to the output of the baton. This will glow red when the Castle door is opened.

The Crumble and Sparkles are powered by 3AA batteries. Croc-leads connect “+” and “-” pads on the battery box to the power-in pads on the top left of the Crumble.

In order to detect when the castle door is opened and so trigger the red Sparkle, we used the CRV line follower module. These have optical reflective sensors at each end which contain an IR LED and a phototransistor. As well as detecting black and white they can, therefore, be used as proximity sensors. The module is powered by connecting the “+” and “-” pads to the second pair of pads on the battery box. The left output (“L”) is connected to the Crumble’s input “A”.

Programming the Crumble

Screen Shot 2015-10-31 at 15.47.43The program uses 2 random numbers to give a flickering fire effect. The range of variable “t” is 2 to 255 and sets the brightness of the green LEDs. Variable “u” picks a random number between 0 and 7: the index numbers of one of the Sparkles in the baton. Thus, the brightness of all the green Sparkles is varying randomly.

Variable “v” monitors “Input A”, which is connected to the line following module. When the voltage from the module is higher than a certain threshold, the single Sparkle (index number 8) is turned to red. The Crumble software continuously updates the values of the variables being used (when the Crumble is connected) so we can investigate how opening and closing the Castle door changes “v”. We can then see what threshold is required in the if-block.

Making the Castle

The castle is made from a cereal box with the hinged lid of a wipes packet for the door. We cut holes in the cereal box for the windows, but then covered them with a sheet of paper which had the windows coloured in with black felt-tip pen. We used a pin to make small holes in the paper and create a green glow.

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We cut a door out of cardboard, added some detail with a black pen, and glued it onto the wipe packet lid. Our 5-year-old drew a “zombie” behind the door and I used a pin to prick out his eyes and mouth. We put the Sparkle baton along the bottom of the cereal box and sellotaped the single Sparkle behind the zombie’s face. The line follower module was also taped behind the door, with a hole cut level with the sensor.

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The rest of the electronics was placed inside the cereal box. A piece of adhesive velcro was used to stick the battery box close to the top so that we could easily unclip one of the croc-leads to turn the Sparkles on and off.

The roof is the bottom of an egg box and simply rests on top. The whole castle was given a couple of coats of grey paint and a “garden” to sit in. Finally, our five year-old added a sign to warn off the unwary! Happy Halloween!!

Crafty Crumble Creations: A “police” helmet.

Whenever our 2-year-old finds something with a flashing light on it, he holds it on top of his head and runs around shouting “nee-nah nee-nah”. I decided we would make a flashing helmet, using a variable to set the Sparkle colour and brightness in the Crumble Software.

We used:IMG_9210

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • Crumble controller & Sparkle
  • 1 battery box with croc-clip attachments; 3 AA batteries
  • Croc-leads and a micro-USB cable
  • A switch/Switch Crumb
  • Plastic dome; glue; tissue paper; blue paint; cardboard; & sellotape

Connecting the Crumble

Screen Shot 2015-05-18 at 16.49.34This diagram shows one way of wiring up a Crumble, battery box and switch. The switch is connected to Pad “A” on the Crumble and to the +ve terminal of the battery box. By default, the input pads are at zero Volts (“low”). When they are connected to the batteries they receive 5 Volts (“high”).

In this case, when the switch is pressed, input A is connected to the batteries. In the software, therefore, we can use the “Wait until A is Hi” block to tell the Crumble what to do when the switch is pressed.

The croc-leads on the right-hand-side of the Crumble connect to a Sparkle (see previous blog posts)

IMG_9053The photo, left, shows the Crumble and Sparkle connected with a standard push-to-make switch. There are a couple of problems with this set up, though. Firstly, 2 IMG_9056croc-clips have to connect to the top-left “power-in” pad on the Crumble. Also, the tips of the two croc-clips connected to the switch are very close (see right) and can easily short-circuit.

IMG_9061A tidier soloution is to use a Switch Crumb (the one pictured is designed and sold by 4tronix ). This has pass-through power lines, like the Sparkles, meaning it can be connected in line with the battery box and the Crumble.

A pad at the bottom of the Crumb connects to an input on the Crumble (the yellow wire in the picture), in this case to Input A.

Programming the Crumble

Screen Shot 2015-05-18 at 15.25.18Within each Sparkle there are actually 3 LEDs: red, blue & green. Their relative brightnesses are varied to create any colour from the visible spectrum. The RGB Sparkle block (below) allows us to precisely control the colour, by setting each of the LEDs to a value between 0 (off) and 255 (maximum brightness). In this program we keep red and green at 0, only changing the blue.Screen Shot 2015-09-19 at 08.37.25

 

The Crumble program used is shown above. It continuously checks to see if Input A is high (i.e. if the switch has been pressed). When it is, a loop is executed five times. This gradually increases the brightness of the blue LED within the Sparkle then decreases it (by incrementing the variable “t” from 0 to 200 then decrementing back to 0).

Constructing the HelmetIMG_9191

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The plastic dome came from a supermarket package of profiteroles. A hole was cut in the top so the lid of a fabric softener bottle could be inserted. We glued bits of torn tissue paper all over the plastic (a la CBeebies “Mr Maker”) so that it could be painted blue.

The Sparkle was positioned so that it shone up into the the bottle top and the rest of the electronics was sellotapIMG_9205ed into the dome then covered with a circle of card, leaving the switch exposed.

I was planning to construct some sort of headband, attached to the bottom of the dome, with the switch mounted on it like a badge. The two-year-old, though, had already decided we were done. After that, he was never still enough for me to take a better photo than this (see right), so I think I can claim the project was a success!

DISCLAIMER: Clearly this is not a “toy” that would pass any of the safety tests required to make it suitable for under-threes.  The construction of the helmet was an afternoon distraction and our child was closely supervised at all times.

Crafty Crumble Creations: A flashing Christmas tree

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In this project conductive thread was used to connect a chain of Sparkles together. This meant we ended up with far fewer trailing wires and bulky crocodile clips.

We used:

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • 1 Crumble controller & 5 Sparkles
  • 1 battery box with croc-clip attachments; 3 AA batteries
  • 3 croc-leads (red, black & green); 1 micro-USB cable
  • A piece of evenweave fabric
  • Red embroidery cotton & tapestry needle
  • Conductive thread (available from Mindsets )
  • Green sticky-backed felt, glitter glue & stickers
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IMG_7849 First the Sparkles were tacked onto the evenweave fabric with standard embroidery cotton. This held them in place for stitching with conductive thread. The connections have to go into the left side of each Sparkle and out of the right side to the next Sparkle in the chain.

To avoid crossed wires (threads), the Sparkles were arranged with their connection pads forming a rough “spiral”.

IMG_7857The conductive thread needs to form a good contact with the gold pads so two or three tight stitches were sewn at each connection point. The evenweave fabric proved to be a good choice as it enabled the stitches to be sewn right on top of each other. A simple running stitch connects one Sparkle to the next in the chain.

IMG_7854It is important to keep checking that different pieces of conductive thread are kept separate. In the picture to the left, too much frayed thread has been left on the back of the fabric after tying off. Threads from two separate knots are touching, causing a short circuit.

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Once all the Sparkle pads were connected with the conductive thread, the first Sparkle in the chain was attached to the Crumble with croc-leads. (For more information on connecting up the Crumble, battery box, and Sparkle see the previous blog post, or the Crumble “Getting Started” guide.)

Screen Shot 2014-12-21 at 18.40.49The Crumble program is shown, left. Originally, I thought that Sparkle “0” would be the star at the top of the tree, which is why it’s gold, but in the end the shape wasn’t quite right. It would have been simple to re-program the Crumble to change the gold to green/red, but, shining through the felt, it looked green so I never got round to it..

IMG_7860Two matching Christmas Tree shapes were cut from the green felt and the Sparkles were sandwiched between them. Extra pieces of felt were inserted at the top, just behind the input pads of Sparkle 0. This stopped the front and back sticking together so the croc-leads could be connected and disconnected.

IMG_7872The Christmas tree was then decorated with glitter glue and stickers.

The battery box and the Crumble were concealed among Christmas cards on the mantelpiece and the croc-leads were sellotaped so that the ends dangled down. The croc-leads were connected to the Sparkle within the Christmas tree, so it hangs from the mantelpiece.

Crafty Crumble Creations: A colour changing lamp

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This is the first in a series of posts, incorporating the Crumble Controller into simple craft projects, “helped” by my just-turned 5-year-old. The electronics aspect was a bit beyond him: he doesn’t yet have the motor skills to clip the croc-clips or to drag-and-drop the software blocks with a trackpad. He enjoyed working on the design of the lamp, though, and the whole project was completed quickly enough to hold his interest.

We used:

  • 1 laptop with Crumble software installed
  • 1 Crumble controller
  • 1 Sparkle
  • 1 micro-USB cable
  • 1 battery box with croc-clip attachments; 3 AA batteries
  • 3 croc-leads (red, black & green)
  • 1 plastic shower gel bottle (washed & thoroughly dried)
  • 1 cardboard box
  • 1 sheet of black card; silver wrapping paper & stickers
  • Scissors, hole-punch & sellotape
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IMG_7601Sparkle to Crumble
The Crumble can be powered from the computer, via the USB cable, but the Sparkles need extra power. The red lead from the battery box was connected to the top-left pad of the Crumble (+) and the black lead to the pad below (-). Power passes through the Crumble to the pads on the top-right. The red and black croc-leads connect from the Crumble’s power-out + and – pads, respectively, to the top 2 pads on the left side of the Sparkle. The green croc-lead connects pad ‘D’ on the Crumble to the bottom-left pad on the Sparkle to send the data to the Sparkle. This is shown in the diagram, left.

The Crumble was connected to the computer, via the USB lead, and we began to experiment with setting the Sparkle colour.

 

The five-year-old was keen on red and green, but I managed to persuade him to go with a more muted colour palette of blue, violet and cyan. The next version of the Crumble software will include a “fade to..” command for Sparkle control which will allow a bigger range of colours to be used with smooth transitions.

The final program is shown to the right.

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Once we had programmed the Crumble and were happy with the colours, we disconnected it from the USB lead and began to construct our lamp.

We found a box big enough to contain the battery box, crumble and sparkle and cut a whole in the top to stand the plastic bottle in. The sparkle was sellotaped inside the box so that it shines straight up into the bottle and the rest of the electronics were squashed in around it.

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Meanwhile, the 5-year-old had found a hole punch and started making holes in a sheet of red paper. He turned this into a cylinder to cover the plastic bottle.

Aesthetically, I felt we could do a bit better. I wrapped the box in an off-cut of wrapping paper and replaced the red paper with black card. The 5-year-old had already worked out that it’s necessary to fold paper or card to make holes in the middle, so the cylinder became a cuboid. A few scattered silver dot stickers enhanced the random effect.

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FINAL THOUGHTS: The lamp ended up looking better than I expected, given how quickly it was thrown together. The tangle of wires in the box, though, is not ideal: shorter croc-leads and a more secure way of fixing the Sparkle in place are required. A switch on the outside would also be useful so we could turn the lamp off and on without taking it apart.

Can you do any better? We’d love to hear about your Crumble projects!

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